What to Do If Your Furnace Is Leaking Water

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Indoor puddles are never a good sign — especially if they’re coming from your furnace.

A leaky furnace can put your entire house on hold until you deal with it. Which begs the question, how do you deal with it?

Living with a leaky furnace and aren’t sure what you should be doing? Don’t panic — we’ve got you covered.

Here’s everything you need to know about what to do about a furnace leaking water.

 

Step One: Stem the Flow

First, you need to stop the water from spreading.

Remove any furniture, rugs, or other loose objects from around the furnace to give you room to work and to prevent them from getting water damaged.

How you dry up the water that’s already hit the floor depends on what kind of flooring you have and how big the puddle already is. For smaller spills, a large pile of towels will do. But large spills might require the assistance of a wet/dry vacuum or pump.

Once the area is dry, set up fans and dehumidifiers to keep the area dry until you fix the furnace.

 

Troubleshooting: Why Is Your Furnace Leaking Water?

Next, you need to try to figure out why your furnace might be leaking.

Furnaces are very complicated (and sometimes super temperamental) pieces of equipment.

Anything from where you keep your furnace to the time of year can affect it. That said, here are a few of the most common causes of a leak.

 

A Simple Clog

A clog is the most common reason you could wind up with a puddle around your furnace.

Your furnace generates a little run-off liquid naturally through condensation — which is why it hooks up to a drain.

That said, drains are not infallible.

After a while, dust, dirt, and other random debris can build up in the drain, causing a clog. And, when the water that runs off your furnace can’t go down, it’s going to wind up coming back up.

 

Broken Drain Pan

The evaporator coil in your furnace generates a lot of condensation, which is why it comes with a drain pan to collect any excess moisture.

But, after a while, water can work its way through just about anything.

If you have an older furnace, there’s a good chance that the condensation the drain pan catches has caused it to rust through.

Alternatively, the drain pan can stop draining correctly, and overflow.

 

Dirty Filter

If air cannot pass through your furnace smoothly, you could wind up with a severe ice issue.

When you have a dirty filter, ice can build up on your furnaces evaporator coils. And, after a while, that ice will start to melt — causing a mini flood around your unit.

Handyman replaces a furnace filter with a clean one

 

Plumbing Issues

Finally, you may also be able to attribute your leaky furnace to old fashioned plumbing malfunctions.

All it takes is one burst or corroded pipe, and you could be looking at some pretty pressing water damage. That is, if you don’t act fast!

 

Call in the Professionals

Now that you know why your furnace is leaking, it’s time to decide what you’re going to do about it.

A furnace leaking water is no easy afternoon DIY fix. No matter what is causing the leak, fixing a furnace can be difficult, time-consuming, and, not to mention, potentially dangerous.

If you’ve got a leaky furnace, your best bet is to call in a professional to help you out.

Have a leaky furnace that needs fixing? We’ve got you covered!

Contact us for more information about our services or to schedule a repair today.

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